Krono Swiss Laminate Switzerland

Based on the solid, rustic floor of real wood, the 14 mm GRAND SELECTION ORIGIN   resembles the original so close that even experts hardly can tell the difference.

With the AQUA STOP EXTREME Water Resistant!

 

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Innovative: Looks and feels like a precious hardwood floor – unrivaled in depth and precision of how the structure meets perfectly with the decor. Produced with the latest technology as well as the famous Swiss Quality awareness.

Healthy: Produced to strict European Standards. For a healthy living, emissions are the same as you would expect from wood in its natural state. GRAND SELECTION is made of 100% natural materials, mainly wood. This natural product, which according to a recent survey by the prestigious Fraunhofer Institute poses no risk to health. This makes it particularly suitable for young children and pets, who spend a lot of time in contact with the floor.

Ecological: Made of wood from sustainable managed forests and whenever possible we look for the relevant FSC® certificates. Produced at the most modern, environmental friendly production facility of its kind.

Resilient: Superior abrasion (cl. AC 5/33), scratch- and impact resistance as well as colorfast (anti-fade) and anti-static properties.

Affordable: Unbeatable price/performance ratio compared to traditional hard wood floors: You not only save initially when buying the floor but again later on in both money and time. It is a low maintenance and easy to care flooring. There is no need to wax, polish or sanding it, and it stays looking like the day you laid it for years and years.

       krono Swiss Features

 

 

 

INSTALLATION INSTRUCTION

 

Allowing for expansion and contraction

Wood will move depending on the ambient temperature and humidity so you must allow for any expansion and contraction to take place, otherwise you will find the floor lifting up in the most unlikely places. You make this allowance by leaving a 10mm gap around the edge of the floor and the 10mm plastic packers in the installation kit shown above are ideal for this. However, don’t forget to allow 10mm around every edge of the floor – for instance, around radiator pipes and at doorways amongst others. Don’t worry about this 10mm gap being visible when you’ve laid the floor – we’ll deal with finishing off the floor later.

A guide for this allowance for expansion and contraction is 1mm per meter of flooring on each edge of the floor, so be careful if your room is greater than 10 meters in any one direction, or if you’re running a floor through a doorway from one room into another without a break and the combined length of flooring in the two rooms exceeds 10 meters. In these situations you can either increase the 10mm allowance – for example, if your expanse of floor is 14 meters long, allow 14mm on both sides of the room – or put in an expansion joint profile, for instance across a doorway.

The Valinge 5G jointing systemJust before we get into telling you how to lay the floor, it’s worth explaining how these the jointing system works and just how versatile it is.With this jointing system, the longitudinal joints are different to the header joints so let’s start off with the longitudinal joint.

Put the tongue of the new board into the groove of the board already in place at an angle of about 40º and then ease the board down until the two boards are flush with each other as shown.

For the header joints, position the tongue of one board and the groove of the other board so that they are in the right place and then using your hand, push down on the top of the board until you hear an audible click. If the top surfaces of the two boards are not flush with each other, you know the joints have not engaged correctly.

Now you can start laying your new floor
It’s best to start in a left-hand corner of the room and work from the left-hand side to the right-hand side of the room. Doorways can present a bit of a problem, so give some thought as to how you’re going to cope with them before you decide which wall to start from.First of all, put down your underlay as described above and don’t forget to use a separate DPM on a concrete subfloor if there isn’t one already built in to your chosen underlay.

Take your first board and saw the tongue off the longitudinal joint and if necessary, off the header joint as well.

Then lay the board in the corner of the room with what was the tongue-side of the board facing the wall and insert at least two 10mm plastic packers along the back wall and one along the wall on your left to allow for expansion and contraction. The reason for cutting the tongues off is that the tongue on a board projects by 3mm so if you put a packer between the board and the wall without cutting the tongue off, you will end up with a 13mm gap between the wall and the actual surface of the floor. Most skirtings are 14mm thick so there’s a danger the expansion/contraction gap will be visible.

Take the second board, cut the tongue off the longitudinal joint ONLY, and join the header joint to the header joint of the first one as shown above. Don’t forget to put two more 10mm plastic packers along the back wall.

Keep laying the boards in your first row (all with the tongues cut off the longitudinal joints up against the wall) until you can’t fit any more full-length boards in the row. Either measure the required length of the last board in the row not forgetting to allow for the 10mm gap at the end, or

(1) turn a full board round the wrong way (keeping the decorative surface uppermost) and lay
it groove-to-groove against the last board you’ve laid

(2) position it so that it’s tight up against the right-hand wall and insert a 10mm packer so that
it’s sitting on TOP of the tongue. Do NOT under any circumstances cut off the tongue on the header joint and do not place the packer between the tongue and the wall otherwise you will end up with a 13mm gap

(3) Using a set square, draw a line across the board in line with the header joint of the last board laid

Cut the board to length, cut off the tongue on the longitudinal joint that is going up against the wall, and put the board in place.

Congratulations – you’ve now laid the first row!

The next row

Take the offcut from the end of the first row and unless it’s less than 300mm in length, use it to start the second row, not forgetting to put a 10mm plastic packer between it and the wall.

Just to repeat, put the tongue of the first board of the new row into the groove of the board of the first row at an angle of about 40º and then ease the board down until the two boards are flush with each other as shown.

 

For the header joints, position the tongue of one board and the groove of the other board so that they are in the right place and then using your hand, push down on the top of the board until you hear an audible click. If the top surfaces of the two boards are not flush with each other, you know the joints have not engaged correctly.

The last row

When you get to the last row, you will almost certainly have to cut the boards lengthways to get them to fit between the wall and the floor you’ve already laid. The simplest way to do this is to measure the distance between the wall and the floor you’ve already laid with a tape measure, deduct 10mm to allow for expansion and contraction, and cut the board accordingly. You’ll be surprised how often the walls of a room are slightly out so take the measurement at both ends of the board and if necessary in the middle of the board.

This last row can be a little fiddly to fit and this is where the pull-bar comes into its own. Use it on both the longitudinal and header joints wherever necessary.

Doorways
Doorways take a little bit of thought, especially if you’re running the floor through from one room to another without a break, but providing you plan ahead, they shouldn’t be too much trouble.

Before you get too close to the doorway, in fact before you start laying the floor, get an offcut of the floor
and the underlay, position it against the door jamb, and use a hand saw to undercut any door linings and architrave sections as shown. Clear out any rubbish underneath the door frame so that the floor can move freely underneath.

If you’re running the floor through the doorway without a break, obviously undercut the door linings and architraves all the way through – if you’re stopping the floor at the doorway, just cut the door lining as far as the floor is going. You should end up with a gap at the bottom of the door jamb which allows you to slide the floor and the underlay underneath, which at the same time gives you the 10mm gap for expansion and contraction, now conveniently out of sight underneath the door lining.

When you get to the doorway with the floor, you will have to cut the boards to shape so that they fit round the edges of the door jambs. Don’t forget to allow the 10mm for expansion and contraction wherever necessary. Remember also that the 10mm expansion and contraction gap running along the wall or skirting board will disappear under the door lining once you get to the architrave around the door frame.

KronoSwiss Installation

KronoSwiss Installation Video

Sunset 14mm

Krono Swiss Laminate Switzerland

Moon 14mm

Krono Swiss Laminate Switzerland

Volcano 14mm

Krono Swiss Laminate Switzerland

Rock 14mm

Krono Swiss Laminate Switzerland

Terra 14mm

Krono Swiss Laminate Switzerland

Sunshine 14mm

Krono Swiss Laminate Switzerland

Beach 14mm

Krono Swiss Laminate Switzerland

Snow 14mm

Krono Swiss Laminate Switzerland